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How to hire Talent during the looming Supply Chain Talent Crisis

Posted by SCOPE Recruiting on Aug 3, 2017 6:09:00 AM

The demand for supply chain professional exceeding supply could reach as high as 9:1 by 2020. Companies need to utilize new technologies and prepare the next generation to succeed in a rapidly changing industry according to a DHL survey.The report ‘The Supply Chain Talent Shortage: From Gap to Crisis’ was commissioned by DHL and authored by Lisa Harrington, president of the lharrington group LLC.

"Leading companies understand that their supply chains – and the people who run them – are essential to their ability to grow profitably," observed report author Lisa Harrington. "However the task of finding people with the right skillsets required to run these highly complex operations is increasingly difficult – especially at the middle and upper management levels."

Today, the ideal employee has both tactical/ operational expertise and professional competencies such as analytical skills. Some 58% of companies’ said this combination is hard to find. But tomorrow’s talent must also excel at leadership, strategic thinking, innovation, and high-level analytic and technological capabilities.

In addition to an changing skill requirements, her study says other reasons for the personnel shortage includes an aging workforce and a lack of personnel development. One third of companies surveyed have taken no steps to create or feed their future talent pipeline. 

"We recommend that companies start with prioritizing the development of their current talent pool to adapt to the changing job requirements through training programs, and then retaining staff through clear career paths," noted Louise Gennis, DHL Supply Chain vice president for Talent Management/Acquisition, Learning & Development.

The industry is still contending with the impression that other fields are more prestigious and offer more opportunities, fueling lack of interest in the industry within the world’s future workforce.

Harrington added: "We strive to combat misconceptions surrounding working in the supply chain through highlighting the technological developments which are digitizing the industry and that are attractive to younger demographics," 

"New technologies and fundamental areas of the supply chain have changed, meaning [companies] now require that a person has a different and much larger skillset than required when most of the current workforce began their careers." she continued. 


In our recent blog post "Why work with Procurement Recruiters" we highlight the advantages that come from working with specialized supply chain recruiters.  

 

Find Supply Chain Talent Today 

Topics: Industry Trends

4 Interview Questions to Hire the Right Leader

Posted by SCOPE Recruiting on Jul 14, 2017 6:41:00 AM

In the Supply Chain and Operations industry, a leader can make or break the success and culture of a supply chain organization or manufacturing/distribution environment. These questions will help you to assess candidates for your next leadership hire.

1. What is your proudest leadership moment?

This question will provide great insight into an employees’ values and leadership style, and you can assess if it aligns with your organization’s values. Do they provide an example of a very people centric situation, a number driven leadership moment, or perhaps something entirely different? Follow up with questions around how they accomplished the specific result.

 

2. How do you provide feedback and develop your team?

A new leader can have a major impact on your current employees’ retention and development. Asking how they manage and develop their teams will give insight how well they align with your organization’s philosophy. The right individual who can successfully manage and develop their employees, can create a whole new wave of leaders for your organization.

 

 3. How have you successfully led a change management initiative?

This comes back to Point #1 of not selling yourself short. After you are established in your career you can leave off internships, summer jobs, and non-relevant roles; but be sure to include positions you have had within the Supply Chain and Operations field. For your most recent roles within the last 10 years, make sure to provide thorough details on the scope of responsibilities and accomplishments. You can leave less details on roles beyond 10+ years, but be sure to include the major accomplishments that would be a benefit to the role are applying for. For the sake of keeping your resume around 2 pages, it is OK to condense your earlier roles at the same company such as “ABC Company – Buyer, Sr. Buyer, and Purchasing Analyst 2000-2005” and summarize your total experience and accomplishments during that time frame.

 

 4.  Describe a time you failed as a leader or manager?

This question will give you a well-rounded view of your candidates and provide insight into how well they recognize their flaws and shortcomings. Ask the follow up question of “In hindsight, how would you manage the situation knowing what you do now?”

 

 

Interested to learn how our team of Supply Chain & Operations Recruiters can help finding leaders for your open positions? Contact Our Recruiting Team Today!


 

Topics: Leadership Trends

Engagement and Retention Start Day One

Posted by SCOPE Recruiting on Jul 13, 2017 3:15:00 PM

Bringing in a new Supply Chain or Operations employee is a large investment to your business, and a successful onboarding process is an important facet in developing a strong relationship with the new employee. This leads directly to increased employee retention, employee satisfaction, and better performance—all critical areas in maintaining a successful Supply Chain and Operations team.

Take Care of Necessities

Send as much paperwork to the new hire ahead of time. For what can’t be sent in advance, ensure that it is ready to go on their first day of the job. This will allow for the employee to spend their first day learning about the organization, team, and role specifics.

Provide the Tools They Need

In addition to making sure your employee has their designated workspace, make sure their computer, phone, other technology needs, and necessary credentials are set-up or you have coordinated the set-up with your IT team. Go the extra mile to stock their desk with office supplies, PPE (as needed), and provide a welcome card from company leadership or their new team.

Show the Big Picture

Immerse the employee in the company’s culture. Teach them about the history, organizational structure, and products or services. Share the company’s direction and how their role will be able to impact that strategy.

Make It Personal

Meet the new employee when they arrive, and make formal introductions to their colleagues explaining each person’s role. Try to arrange lunches for their first week or few days – with their direct manager, with HR, and with several of their immediate colleagues. Throughout the first week, coordinate short introductions to important stake-holders and extended colleagues.

Create an Initial Schedule

Set a realistic task for the new employee to work on during their first few days and week. Keep them engaged with some useful work mixed in with necessary training. Create a schedule to provide them in advance with deadlines, meetings, and orientations. If they will be shadowing certain people in the Plant, Distribution Center, or office include those details as well. Defining expectations for the new-hires will calm their nerves and show the efficiency of your business.

Create Regular Check-Ins

Set reoccurring meetings to discuss their progress, address questions, and continue integrating them into the fold of ongoing activities and initiatives. Leave the door open for questions and continued immersion into the business.

 

Following these key pillars in your onboarding strategy will help shape the future or your organization's culture for years to come.

 

Needing Supply Chain & Operations talent to fill your open vacancies? Learn more about how SCOPE Recruiting can help.

Contact Our Recruiting Team Today!


 

Topics: Hiring Advice

6 Common Resume Myths & Our Tips

Posted by SCOPE Recruiting on Jul 13, 2017 10:41:00 AM

Our Supply Chain & Operations recruiters constantly see new resumes and receive questions from candidates about common resume myths. Here are 6 scenarios we often see, and our suggestion for how to manage them.

1. Keep my resume to 1 page.

Unless you are a new graduate or still early in your career, don’t sell yourself short by condensing your resume to one page. Aim to keep it at 2 pages, and be sure to highlight not only your responsibilities, but also your key accomplishments for each position. Make sure to get specific with your accomplishments too (ie: Reduced plant turnover by 27% within first 6 months, Re-negotiated MRO supply agreement to achieve 30% savings on $1M spend, Increased on-time delivery to customers by 67% through implementation of freight quality control program, etc). 

2. Leave gaps in employment unexplained or exaggerate dates to keep these hidden.

Absolutely don’t exaggerate dates on your resume—employers can easily verify your career history and lying is an easy way to get removed from the interview process. If you have a gap in your career that you believe may warrant a question, one option could be to add in a short description to your resume. Were you affected by a lay-off and out of work for a few months? Below that job title you could add in something like "Reason for leavig employer: Company downsized work-force by 25% affecting position." Or did you take time off for personal reasons such as caring for a new child? You could add something like "May 2010-May 2012 – Extended parental leave.”

 3. Only include the last 10 years of employment.

This comes back to Point #1 of not selling yourself short. After you are established in your career you can leave off internships, summer jobs, and non-relevant roles; but be sure to include positions you have had within the Supply Chain and Operations field. For your most recent roles within the last 10 years, make sure to provide thorough details on the scope of responsibilities and accomplishments. You can leave less details on roles beyond 10+ years, but be sure to include the major accomplishments that would be a benefit to the role are applying for. For the sake of keeping your resume around 2 pages, it is OK to condense your earlier roles at the same company such as “ABC Company – Buyer, Sr. Buyer, and Purchasing Analyst 2000-2005” and summarize your total experience and accomplishments during that time frame.

 4.  List references or write “References Upon Request”.

This is non-essential. If you are applying for a job, the assumption is that you will be able to provide references when asked.

 5.  List hobbies to show your personality.

Do you like to play golf or love bird watching? That is great, but it has no place on your Supply Chain & Operations resume. Do make sure to share your involvement with professional associations, board memberships with charities and other volunteer organizations, professional publications you have, professional awards you’ve received, and Supply Chain & Operations training or certifications you’ve received.

 6.  Have one go-to resume and use it for all jobs. 

It is extremely beneficial to keep an active resume even if you are not looking; however, before you apply to a position tailor your resume to the specific job and company you are applying for. Read through the job description and see if your resume highlights that same experience. If there are certain things left off your resume that you have in fact done, be sure to add them. For example, if an organization uses SAP and you helped implement a new SAP module at a prior role, add that. Or if a role requires international supply chain leadership, and you’ve managed employees across multiple countries in your previous role, highlight that. Pro tip - Add a reoccurring appointment in your calendar to update your resume once a month with new accomplishments so you don’t forget!

 

If you are working with a Supply Chain recruiter, don’t hesitate to ask them for advice on your specific resume question. They want to help you present the best first impression to their clients, and likely have a great solution to your resume question or myth.

 

Are you interested in confidentially exploring a new Supply Chain or Operations opportunity yourself? 

Upload Your Resume Today! 


 

Topics: Career Advice

How to impress your Supply Chain and Operations Candidates

Posted by SCOPE Recruiting on Jul 7, 2017 9:57:00 AM

Candidates aren’t the only ones that need to make a good impression during an interview. In today’s competitive Supply Chain & Operations recruiting market, it is critical that a company not only has a strong value proposition, but creates a positive interview experience for the candidates.

Creating a positive experience really comes down to focusing on 3 key areas – Consensus, Process, and Communication.

The quickest turn-off for a candidate is when they see a lack of consensus from the interview team. Before kicking off interviews for a role, the stakeholders should ensure that the hiring team has a clear understanding of the particular role, how it fits into the organization, and what key things they need for the candidate to be able to contribute.

During the consensus phase, interview teams should also formalize the interview process—defining the who/what/when of interview steps and what they should be assessing. By formalizing the process beforehand the total time and travel will be minimized for the candidates, and time and travel expense will be minimized for your organization as well. Skype or other video conferencing tools are a great supplement to an interview process, and can limit candidate traveling and expenses particularly for follow-up interviews or for interviewers based at other locations.

At least 3 days prior to an on-site interview, aim to provide the candidates an agenda which includes times, locations, and names and job titles of the interviewers. Share what interview format they should expect and if it will include any type of plant tour, personality analysis, or skills assessment. The candidates should be informed of any specific directions around parking or entrances, who to ask for upon arrival, if they need to wear any specific attire or bring safety gear, and have a contact’s phone number in case of travel issues or other circumstances.

Most importantly, maintain regularly communication to keep the candidates engaged. While coordination and feedback can be a slower process due to heavy travel schedules and busyness of the interviewers, maintain the priority of keeping candidates warm. A quick e-mail (even if it is “Still Waiting”) goes a long way in keeping a candidate engaged. Whether you move forward with a candidate or not, providing prompt and constructive feedback is important at every stage. Feedback is incredibly appreciated and leaves them with a positive impression of your organization.

If you aren’t already, aim to focus on these few areas when you kick of your next search. And remember, your Supply Chain & Operations Recruiting firm is a great resource to lean on to facilitate this process and keep communication flowing with your prospective candidates.

 

Interested to learn more about how SCOPE Recruiting can ensure your Supply Chain & Operations candidates have a positive interview experience?

Contact Our Recruiting Team Today!


 

Topics: Hiring Advice

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